Wednesday, April 2, 2008

Not Against:With

"Always fall in with what you're asked to accept. Take what is given, and make it over your way. My aim in life has always been to hold my own with whatever's going. Not against: with."
Robert Frost


Every song, Every book, every magazine article, has a hook. So does every fisherman. Without a hook, you are much less likely to catch a fish. When baited with something the fish is interested in, the fish comes hither, and begins to investigate. It takes just a small taste and before you know it, he's hooked. He struggles and struggles, all the while, only becoming more deeply hooked. When the fisherman begins to reel on the other end, the deal is sealed. If only he hadn't investigated that tasty morsel. But, it's man's nature to seek sustenance, and it's in the nature of the fish to seek sustenance. Their nature's intersect.

Just like the "hook" of a familiar song, advertising jingle, or sales pitch, or first line of a novel, It's the hooks in our lives that bring us closer to what we're suppose to be learning. If a song doesn't have a great hook, (a catchy line or melodic phrase), you aren't likely to listen further, and find out what the song's really about. How likely are you to continue reading a book, if the first paragraph doesn't grab your attention? There are lots of hooks in our lives. Some we swallow willingly, and others that snag us unaware. Both cause us great struggle, but just as the fish realizes it's no use in struggling, and surrenders to the hand of the fisherman, so must we.

Once we're hooked, and we realize we're hooked, swimming against the stream is fruitless.

It usually happens when we're swimming aimlessly along, unaware of the boat above us. Oh it's motor is running, but we don't hear it. We're too involved with the dramas in our lives. We're swimming along, but we're not really swimming. Not really enjoying the warmth of the water, and the glorious feeling of weightlessness, but we're swimming alright--right into the hook of the master fisherman, who's been trying to get our attention for sometime now. Before you know it we're snagged, foul hooked, and we begin to struggle. But it's only when we stop struggling that we can see that the fisherman's intention was to get our attention. He's been putting out bait for sometime now, and it was only serendipity that you happened to swim past it and it grabbed hold of your bathing suit. Had we been swimming mindfully, appreciating all of the sensations that swimming allows, we may have learned our lesson in a much more direct way. But then again, the more painful the lesson, the more deeply embedded. Sure enough, the next time we enter the water, we're much more aware. But we've learned something new.For it is in man's nature to learn and grow; And it's the universe's nature to instruct. Their nature's intersect, and it's no accident.

"Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught."
~Author Unknown

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